Kedgeree

My grandmother and mother used to make this dish. I had been craving it for ages, but never had smoked haddock on hand (how about that).

kedgeree

I’ve heard several versions of the origins of this dish. Some say the Scottish troupes brought  the original recipe to India during the British Raj, where it picked up the flavourful curry spices and rice before circling back to Scotland. It has also been said that it was brought to Victorian England as a breakfast dish by British colonials returning from India. I always liked the version that British colonialists couldn’t handle curried rice so they had to add bacon and eggs to it, just like how British soldiers allegedly could only stomach their quinine-rich anti-malarial tonic water with gin, thus creating the gin and tonic.

In any case, this dish blends some absolutely incredible and simple ingredients to create a great cultural mishmash.

A word on smoked haddock:
Give them a chance. I used to flee in terror when my godfather ate smoked haddock for his afternoon tea. He assured me it was delicious, but I would not believe him. Last summer I hiked the Speyside trail through Scotland, and absolutely adored that breakfast regulary featured smoked fish. Sometimes it was fairly familiar, like smoked salmon with scrambled eggs, but one morning I was treated to two whole fish, split and smoked. It was outstanding. But I digress. While they might not look appealing, the smoked haddock lends and absolutely smokey and salty flavour to the kedgeree.

6 slices of bacon
3 filets of smoked haddock
5 eggs
3 cups of brown rice
1 onion, chopped
2 tbsp oil
1 cup peas
1 tbsp each tumeric, garam masala, and tandoori spice

kedgereeingredients

1. Cook the bacon. I lined a baking sheet with tinfoil and lay the strips on a drying rack to let the fat drip off, and baked them at 250 for 2o minutes. Once crisp, chop it all up.
2. Cook the eggs. You can scramble them, bake them, hardboil them, or steam them. I find when I steam the eggs their shells are much easier to removed. They take about 14 minutes in the steamer. Once fully cooked and shelled, chop the eggs.
3. Remove the skin and flake the smoked haddock fillets.
4. Fry the onions in the oil.
5. Once the onions begin to brown, add the spices and continue to cook for five more minutes.
6. Add the bacon, peas, fish, eggs, and rice. Cook together for five minutes.

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